Vernacular Manuscript Culture 1000-1500
Title
Vernacular Manuscript Culture 1000-1500
Price
€ 40,50
ISBN
9789087283025
Format
Paperback
Number of pages
272
Language
English
Publication date
Dimensions
14.4 x 19 cm
Table of Contents
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Contents
List of Figures and Plates
Preface
Abbreviations
Vernacular Manuscript Culture 1000-1500: An Introduction / Erik Kwakkel
Worcester and Wales: Copies of the Regula pastoralis in the Early Middle Ages / Kathryn A. Lowe
Manuscripts of the Earliest Middle High German Prayers, c. 1150-1250 / Nigel F. Palmer
Rubricating History in Late Medieval France / Godfried Croenen
Codifying the Law: Frisian Legal Manuscripts around 1300 / Rolf H. Bremmer Jr
Late Medieval and Early Modern Icelandic Saga Manuscripts / Sheryl McDonald Werronen
Thick Quires in Italy / J.P. Gumbert (†)
Notes on Contributors
Colour Plates
Index of Manuscripts
General Index

Reviews and Features

“This is a very important, very timely publication […] This book represents an important step in bringing the manuscript traditions of various vernaculars into dialogue with one another. It is much needed in the current scholarly field.” – Michael Johnston, Associate Professor English, College of Liberal Arts, Purdue University, USA.

Erik Kwakkel (ed.)

Vernacular Manuscript Culture 1000-1500

This volume presents six essays devoted to the practices, habits, and preferences of scribes making manuscripts in their native tongue. Despite the dominance of Latin in medieval written culture, vernacular traditions started to develop in Europe in the eleventh century. Focusing on French, Frisian, Icelandic, Italian, Middle High German, and Old English examples, these essays discuss the connectivity of books originating in the same linguistic space. Given that authors, translators, and readers advanced vernacular written culture through the production and consumption of texts, how did the scribes who copied them fit into this development? Did they have a specific approach to copying texts in their native language? Can we observe patterns in how manuscripts in the same vernacular presented their contents? To address such questions the essays taken material features of manuscripts, both palaeographical and codicological, as a point of departure. Contributions by Rolf H. Bremmer Jr, Godfried Croenen, J.P. Gumbert (†), Kathryn A. Lowe, Sheryl McDonald Werronen and Nigel F. Palmer.
Editor

Erik Kwakkel

Erik Kwakkel teaches at Leiden University, where he directs the research project ‘Turning over a New Leaf: Manuscript Innovation in the Twelfth-Century Renaissance’.