Artisans, Objects and Everyday Life in Renaissance Italy
Title
Artisans, Objects and Everyday Life in Renaissance Italy
Subtitle
The Material Culture of the Middling Class
Price
€ 127,99
ISBN
9789048550265
Format
eBook PDF (Adobe DRM)
Number of pages
364
Language
English
Publication date
Dimensions
17 x 24 cm
Also available as
Hardback - € 128,00
Table of Contents
Show Table of ContentsHide Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Notes on Money, Dates, and Measures
List of Illustrations
List of Tables

Introduction

PART I
BOUNDARIES AND BORDERS: ARTISANS AND LOCAL TRADERS IN RENAISSANCE SOCIETY

Chapter 1: Artisans and Traders in Renaissance Siena
Chapter 2: The Economic Status of Sienese Artisans and Shopkeepers
Chapter 3: Boundaries, Borders and Hierarchies

PART II
CREATIVE ECONOMIES: THE ACQUISITION AND CIRCULATION OF MATERIAL GOODS

Chapter 4: Business and Income
Chapter 5: Buying and Acquiring Material Goods
Chapter 6: Dowries and the Circulation of Material Goods

PART III:
THE OWNERSHIP, DISPLAY, AND MEANINGS OF MATERIAL GOODS

Chapter 7: A Respectable and Comfortable Home
Chapter 8: Novelty, Refinement and 'Splendour'
Chapter 9: The Home on Show

Conclusion

Appendix
Glossary
Bibliography
About the Author
Index

Reviews and Features

Winner of the 2021 Roland H. Bainton Book Prize for Art and Music History, awarded by Sixteenth Century Society & Conference (SCSC) for the best book in the field of Art and Music History!

"This is a well written, detailed, and profusely illustrated, discussion of middle class Italian Renaissance household possessions mainly at Siena, although there are examples from other parts of Italy, in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, the period largely before the Siena was conquered by Florence in 1555–57. The illustrations are striking. [...] A useful book for anyone needing to identify objects in Renaissance literature or works of art."
- R. Burr Litchfield, Seventeenth-Century News, Vol. 79 3&4 (2021)

"In this thoughtful and well-written book, Erichsen illuminates the material culture of what she calls "the middling class," artisans and shopkeepers in Siena, who occupied a social and economic level above the poor and wage laborers and below the prosperous elites. [...] The downwardly mobile, the sick, the damaged, and the poor do not often appear in the sources intended to find and tax the strivers or to enable inheritance. Erichsen’s comprehensive view of rich and neglected sources has brought new people into the study of Renaissance life."
- Steven A. Epstein, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Volume 52, Number 2, Autumn 2021

"This fine book is deeply expert. Its author has worked many years in Siena’s archives, studying the city’s material culture. At the heart of her research are the household inventories, systematic documents, often post-mortem, that went from room to room, laying out in precise detail the objects in each space. [...] The book, thorough and astute, is nicely on top of current scholarship on Renaissance Italian material culture. The meticulous notes very often give the original Italian, a precision very useful to scholars, who will want to check Sienese terminology for things or attributes. The illustrations, all in colour, are plentiful, and carefully captioned: they feature surviving artefacts, and their depiction in works of art, and also show the documents on which the argument rests."
- Thomas V Cohen, Journal of Design History, York University, Toronto, 2021

Paula Hohti Erichsen

Artisans, Objects and Everyday Life in Renaissance Italy

The Material Culture of the Middling Class

Did ordinary Italians have a ‘Renaissance’? This book presents the first in-depth exploration of how artisans and small local traders experienced the material and cultural Renaissance. Drawing on a rich blend of sixteenth-century visual and archival evidence, it examines how individuals and families at artisanal levels (such as shoemakers, barbers, bakers and innkeepers) lived and worked, managed their household economies and consumption, socialised in their homes, and engaged with the arts and the markets for luxury goods. It demonstrates that although the economic and social status of local craftsmen and traders was relatively low, their material possessions show how these men and women who rarely make it into the history books were fully engaged with contemporary culture, cultural customs and the urban way of life.
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Author

Paula Hohti Erichsen

Paula Hohti Erichsen is Professor of the History of Art and Culture at Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture in Helsinki, Finland, and scientific director of the ERC consolidator-grant funded project ‘Refashioning the Renaissance: Popular Groups, Fashion, and the Material and Cultural Significance of Clothing in Europe, 1550-1650’. She is specialized in studies of Italian Renaissance dress, material culture, and decorative arts, with a special focus on their role and function within the classes of artisans and shopkeepers.