The Nordic Beowulf
Title
The Nordic Beowulf
Translator
Martin Naylor
Price
€ 69,00
ISBN
9781802700084
Format
Hardback
Number of pages
286
Language
English
Publication date
Dimensions
15.6 x 23.4 cm
Also available as
eBook PDF - € 69,00
Table of Contents
Show Table of ContentsHide Table of Contents
Prefaces
Chapter 1. Introduction
Chapter 2. The Origins of the Poem
Chapter 3. Some Unproven Premises
Chapter 4. Dating of the Poem
Chapter 5. Archaeological Delimination
Chapter 6. Results of Primary Analysis, Step 1
Chapter 7. The Name Geatas
Chapter 8. Other Links to Eastern Sweden
Chapter 9. Elements of Non-Christian Thinking
Chapter 10. Poetry in Scandinavia
Chapter 11. The Oral Structure of the Poem
Chapter 12. Results of Primary Analysis, Step 2
Chapter 13. Gotland
Chapter 14. Heorot
Chapter 15. Swedes and Gutes
Chapter 16. The Horsemen around Beowulf’s Grave
Chapter 17. Some Linguistic Details
Chapter 18. From Scandinavia to England
Chapter 19. Transmission and Writing Down in England
Chapter 20. Allegorical Representation
Chapter 21. Beowulf and Guta saga
Chapter 22. Chronology
Chapter 23. Retrospective Summary
Bibliography

Bo Graslund

The Nordic Beowulf

In such a wide-ranging, long-standing, and international field of scholarship as Beowulf, one might imagine that everything would long since have been thoroughly investigated. And yet as far as the absolutely crucial question of the poem’s origins is concerned, that is not the case.

This cross-disciplinary study by Bo Gräslund argues that the material, geographical, historical, social, and ideological framework of Beowulf cannot be the independent literary product of an Old English Christian poet, but was in all essentials created orally in Scandinavia, which was a fertile seedbed for epic poetry.

Through meticulous argument interwoven with an impressive assemblage of data, archaeological and otherwise, Gräslund offers possible answers to the questions of the provenance of the Geats, the location of Heorot, and many more, such as the significance of Sutton Hoo and the signification of the Grendel kin and dragon in the sixth century when the events of the poem, coinciding with cataclysmic events in northern Europe, took place.
Author

Bo Graslund

Bo Gräslund is professor emeritus in archaeology at Uppsala University.